Articles online

Estimates of Atmospheric Aerosols Adhered to the High Voltage Electric wire in the Yangtze River Delta Region of China

Category: Technical Note

Volume: 18 | Issue: 2 | Pages: 555-559
DOI: 10.4209/aaqr.2017.06.0218
PDF | RIS | BibTeX

Jingliang Hao1, Leiming Zhang2, Tianliang Zhao 1, Song Gao3, Jie Li3, Yongwei Wang1

  • 1 Key Laboratory for Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation of China Meteorological Administration, School of Atmospheric Physics, Nanjing University of Information, Science and Technology, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210044, China
  • 2 Air Quality Research Division, Environment and Climate Change Canada, Toronto, Ontario M3H5T4, Canada
  • 3 Jiangsu Electric Power Company Electric Power Research Institute, Nanjing, Jiangsu 211103, China


A module of particle dry deposition on wires has been developed in this study.
Annual particle mass on wires is estimated in the range of 1.56 × 104–1.46 × 105 µg.
Particles adhered to wires may be reduced by 85% with rainfall wash-out.


Atmospheric aerosol particles can collect on and adhere to high voltage electrical wires, causing power loss as well as other detrimental effects on electrical insulation. The mass of fine particles (PM2.5) adhering to wires has been estimated using a modified size-resolved particle dry deposition model and a range of annual average PM2.5 concentrations found in literature for the Yangtze River Delta region of China. Annual mass collected by the surface of a unit length (1 m) of wire with a radius of 0.5 cm is estimated to be in the range 1.56 × 104–1.46 × 105 µg. The actual mass adhering to the wire may be reduced by 85% of these estimated values considering the washing-off effects of rain. For a wire of 1.0 cm in radius, the annual mass on the wire is estimated to be in the range of 4.68 × 103–4.35 × 104 µg after considering the effects of rain. This study provides a first estimation of particle mass collected by electrical wires, although


Dry deposition model Electric wire Mass of PM2.5

Related Article

Intercomparison of Atmospheric Dispersion Models Applied to an Urban Street Canyon of Irregular Geometry

Mariana Dezzutti , Guillermo Berri, Laura Venegas
Volume: 18 | Issue: 3 | Pages: 820-828
DOI: 10.4209/aaqr.2017.11.0489

Measurement of Variation of Radon-Thoron and their Progeny Concentrations in Dwellings using Pin Hole Based Dosimeters

Deep Shikha, Vimal Mehta , Rishi Pal Chauhan, Gurmel Singh Mudahar
Volume: 18 | Issue: 3 | Pages: 811-819
DOI: 10.4209/aaqr.2017.10.0405