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Volume 16, No. 11, November 2016, Pages 2933-2949 PDF(11.51 MB)  
doi: 10.4209/aaqr.2015.07.0440   

The Simulation of Long-Range Transport of Biomass Burning Plume and Short-Range Transport of Anthropogenic Pollutants to a Mountain Observatory in East Asia during the 7-SEAS/2010 Dongsha Experiment

Ming-Tung Chuang1, Joshua S. Fu2, Chung-Te Lee3, Neng-Huei Lin4, Yang Gao2, Sheng-Hsiang Wang4, Guey-Rong Sheu4, Ta-Chih Hsiao3, Jia-Lin Wang5, Ming-Cheng Yen4, Tang-Huang Lin6, Narisara Thongboonchoo7

1 Graduate Institute of Energy Engineering, National Central University, Chung-Li 32001, Taiwan
2 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA
3 Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Central University, Chung-Li 32001, Taiwan
4 Graduate Institute of Atmospheric Physics, National Central University, Chung-Li 32001, Taiwan
5 Department of Chemistry, National Central University, Chung-Li 32001, Taiwan
6 Center for Space and Remote Sensing Research, National Central University, Chung-Li 32001, Taiwan
7 College of Chemical Engineering, King Mongkut's Institute of Technology, Bangkok, Thailand

 

Highlights
  • Probing how the long-range transport BB plume approached a high mountain site.
  • Three mechanisms explain how the high-altitude BB plume influenced the ground.
  • The chemical evolution of pollutants in the BB plume from long-range transport.
  • The chemical evolution of pollutants in the air parcel from short-range transport.
  • The quantification of BB and non-BB on the high-altitude site and ground site.

Abstract

 

The Community Multi-scale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) is used to simulate the long-range transport of biomass burning (BB) pollutants from Southeast Asia (SEA) towards the Taiwan Central Mountain Range (CMR) in March and April 2010. The results show that a proportion of the BB plume was blocked and compressed at the windward side of CMR. High-altitude BB plume is shown to influence air quality on the ground via three mechanisms: (1) the subsidence in the anticyclone, (2) the downward motion in the cold surge, and (3) the vertical mixing of the boundary layer over land. Two case studies are further investigated to probe the chemical evolution of the air parcel approaching Mt. Lulin. The first case shows that the third mechanism also explained the increase in the concentrations of peroxyacyl nitrate (PAN), higher peroxyacyl nitrate (PANX), NH3, SO2, and volatile organic compounds in the BB plume when entering the land over western Taiwan. Meanwhile, the percentage of NO3 in the plume is also significantly increased. The second case reveals that valley wind transported air pollutants from the ground to the mountains. The air parcel, accompanied with considerable concentrations of PAN, PANX, SULF, and anthropogenic secondary organic aerosol, moved up Mt. Lulin. The pollutant concentrations, except for elemental carbon, in the air parcel decreased on approach to Mt. Lulin because the air parcel was mixed with a clean air. 

 

 

Keywords: Biomass burning; Lulin high-mountain site; Simulation; 2010 Dongsha experiment.

 

 

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