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Volume 10, No. 2, April 2010, Pages 95-101 PDF(257 KB)  
doi: 10.4209/aaqr.2009.08.0049   

Agricultural Fire Impacts on the Air Quality of Shanghai during Summer Harvesttime

Hongyu Li1,2, Zhiwei Han3, Tiantao Cheng2,3, Huanhuan Du2, Lingdong Kong2, Jianmin Chen2, Renjian Zhang3, Weijie Wang2

1 Weather Modification Office, Beijing Meteorological Bureau, Beijing 100089, China
2 Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433, China
3 Key Laboratory of Region Climate-Environment Research for Temperate East Asia (TEA), Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029, China

 

Abstract

 

Agricultural fire is an important source of atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols. To better understand biomass burning emission originating from fire over Asian agriculture areas and its transport into the downwind atmosphere, aerosols and major trace gases were measured continuously from 22 May to 30 June at Shanghai during the summer harvesttime of 2009. Water-soluble K material contained in aerosols showed a clear day-to-day pattern with an average of 1.25 ± 1.48 µg/m3. K ion loading and ratio of K ion to PM10 drastically increased during ‘K event’ days, accompanying with high PM10, SO2, and NO2 levels. MODIS remote sensing fire map revealed about 80% agricultural fires occurred in the agriculture areas of Anhui, Jiangsu, Shandong and Henan provinces. Four potential source areas of agricultural fires, identified as Shanghai, Zhejiang, Jiangsu and Anhui provinces, had significant contributions to worsen the air quality of Shanghai during the harvest season.

 

 

Keywords: Agricultural fire; Air quality; Potential source.

 

 

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