About AAQR

Aims and Scope

Articles online
For contributors
Call for Papers
Guideline for the
Special Issue Proposal
Subscription
Information

Advertising

Contact Us
 
Search for  in   Search  Advanced search  

 

Volume 13, No. 5, October 2013, Pages 1563-1569 PDF(233 KB)  
doi: 10.4209/aaqr.2013.01.0013   

Short-Term Effects of Fine Particulate Air Pollution on Ischemic Heart Disease Hospitalizations in Taipei: A Case-Crossover Study

Hui-Fen Chiu1, Chiung-Yu Peng,2 Trong-Neng Wu3,4, Chun-Yuh Yang2,4

1 Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
2 Department of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
3 Department of Public Health, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
4 Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, National Health Research Institute, Miaoli, Taiwan

 

Abstract

 

This study was undertaken to determine whether there was a correlation between fine particles (PM2.5) levels and hospital admissions for ischemic heart disease (IHD) in Taipei, Taiwan. Hospital admissions for IHD and ambient air pollution data for Taipei were obtained for the period from 2006–2010. The relative risk of hospital admissions was estimated using a case-crossover approach, controlling for weather variables, day of the week, seasonality, and long-term time trends. For the single pollutant model (without adjustment for other pollutants), increased IHD admissions were significantly associated with PM2.5 on both warm (> 23°C) and cool days (< 23°C), with an interquartile range increase associated with a 12% (95% CI = 10%–14%) and 4% (95% CI = 2%–6%) increase in IHD admissions, respectively. In the two-pollutant models, PM2.5 remained significant after the inclusion of SO2 or O3 both on warm and cool days. This study provides evidence that higher levels of PM2.5 increase the risk of hospital admissions for IHD.

 

 

Keywords: Fine particulate; Air pollution; Ischemic heart disease; Case-crossover; Hospital admissions.

 

 

Copyright © 2009-2014 AAQR All right reserved.