About AAQR

Aims and Scope

Articles online
For contributors
Call for Papers
Guideline for the
Special Issue Proposal
Subscription
Information

Advertising

Contact Us
 
Search for  in   Search  Advanced search  

 

Volume 10, No. 3, June 2010, Pages 292-300 PDF(254 KB)  
doi: 10.4209/aaqr.2009.10.0061   

Characteristics of Traffic-related Emissions: A Case Study in Roadside Ambient Air over Xi’an, China

Zhenxing Shen1,2, Yuemei Han1, Junji Cao2, Jing Tian1, Chongshu Zhu2, Suixin Liu2, Pingping Liu1, Yuanqi Wang1

1 Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, China
2 SKLLQG, Institute of Earth Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 710075, China

 

Abstract

 

Traffic-related emissions were measured at a heavy-traffic roadside in Xi’an at the end of April, 2008 to survey the exposure levels of freshly emitted carbon monoxide (CO), mass and chemical composition (OC, EC, inorganic ions, and PAHs) of PM10, and ozone (O3). In general, high levels of mass concentration and chemical species in PM10 were observed during daily heavy traffic periods (morning, noon, and evening traffic rush hours), especially in the morning traffic rush hour. OC and EC accounted for 9.3% and 3.0% of PM10 mass, respectively, and the ratios of OC/EC were constant during the heavy traffic periods (with a mean value of 3.2). Water-soluble ions constituted 14.0% of PM10 and the dominant ionic species were Ca2+, SO42-, and NO3- in the roadside samples. Re-suspended road dust constituted a large fraction of PM10, causing the PM10 samples to become more alkaline. The concentrations of 12 prior-controlled PAHs revealed the potential high health risk of this roadside area in Xi’an. The diurnal variation in CO and O3 exhibited a different trend, which indicated that CO level was largely influenced by the instantaneous emission of vehicles while O3 was closely associated with the overall traffic conditions and meteorological status.

 

 

Keywords: Roadside; PM10; Chemical composition; CO; O3.

 

 

Copyright © 2009-2014 AAQR All right reserved.